Academic Issues

We want all students to enjoy their time at MMU and to complete their studies successfully. However, issues can arise and this booklet will give the information you need to resolve them quickly and effectively as possible.

 

View the booklet

 

ACADEMIC APPEALS

 

You can appeal decisions by the Board of Examiners (your end of year results) and the Assessment Disciplinary Committee (misconduct panel).

You must have clear grounds to appeal a decision – you cannot appeal just because you disagree with the examiners or you think the result is unfair.

STEPS WHEN DECIDING TO APPEAL

 

There are a number of steps you should take when deciding whether to appeal a decision.

  • The first step is to find out about the results surgery for your department. This gives you the opportunity to discuss your results with a member of University staff. Your Results will have the relevant contact details.

  • Checking the course regulations

  • Gathering documentary evidence

  • Reviewing MMU’s website for more information on Appeals.

MMU website

THE APPEAL PROCESS

 

Here's our guide to submitting an academic appeal

If you're appealing on the grounds of exceptional factors here's a guide to writing your statement

EXCEPTIONAL FACTORS

 

If you have been affected by problems preventing you from attending an exam, submitting an assessment on time or that significantly affected your performance in an assessment, you can submit an appeal for Exceptional Factors.

AN EXCEPTIONAL FACTOR MUST BE:

 

  • Severe: The event or circumstance must have had a serious impact on your performance.

  • Unexpected: There were no reasonable steps you could have taken to prevent these factors.

  • Relevant: The event or circumstance must have happened at the time of assessment.

  • Corroborated: You must provide supporting documentary evidence for your case.

EXAMPLES OF EXCEPTIONAL FACTORS:

 

  • Illness

  • Bereavement

  • Personal trauma

Long-term issues are not generally regarded as relevant unless they have had a specific bearing at the time of assessment. Long term health issues are supported by the University Disability Service.

PLAGIARISM

 

Plagiarism means passing someone else's work off as your own. Poor referencing is also considered as plagiarism and usually receives a penalty.

REMEMBER

 

All work submitted is checked for plagiarism.

You can be penalised for:

  • Plagiarism: copying from authors, not using quotation marks or taking sections from other people’s work and altering it to make it look like your own.

  • Collusion: copying from other students or allowing your work to be copied. Be especially mindful when completing group work.

  • Attempting to gain unfair advantage: paying someone to do your work or falsifying data.

  • Cheating: taking unauthorised material into an exam.

PENALTIES

 

The penalties are more serious if you have been accused of cheating or plagiarism before or if you are a postgraduate student.

Come and talk to the Advice Centre if you wish to appeal any decision or if you need help with any part of the process.